Anti-bullying policies implemented

The definition of bullying is committing an act against someone that endangers the physical and/or emotional health, or their safety. In order to prevent bullying our school, along with many others have anti-bullying policies, that simply state that they will not tolerate students harassing staff or other students, and if they were caught committing such actions would be punished. However, just because schools have policies to protect students from the horrors of being tormented in front of their peers, they can sometimes be taken lightly.

Anti-bullying+policies+implemented

Jasper Ramirez

Hana Sapa, Opinion Editor

The definition of bullying is committing an act against someone that endangers the physical and/or emotional health, or their safety. In order to prevent bullying our school, along with many others have anti-bullying policies, that simply state that they will not tolerate students harassing staff or other students, and if they were caught committing such actions would be punished. However, just because schools have policies to protect students from the horrors of being tormented in front of their peers, they can sometimes be taken lightly.

Shocking facts such as for young people ages 15-24 years old suicide is the second leading cause of death, or that more teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, AIDs, birth defects, stroke, and chronic lung disease combined, or that four out of five teens give clear warning signs that they tried to take their own lives, and yet no one knew.

Due to these rising statistics, and the fact that there have been tragedies linking suicides, and bullying the the school district and a family of a victim of bullying, came to a settlement that schools would insert new practices and policies, in order to prevent tragic events from repeating itself. The district plans to work with the Equity Assistance Center(or the EAC), an organization that provides help in areas of race, gender, and national origin issues, in order to promote educational opportunities.

As for the new policies, they seem to be looking good; since schools are now required to notify if their child is being bullied or contemplating suicide, and ask schools to hold annual seminars to teach parents about bullying, substance abuse, and mental illness. They also imply that school districts and charter schools implement youth suicide prevention groups for students.

“The new policies are simply to raise more awareness to the issue, not only in the schools but also in a community level so as to keep the students safe.” said, assistant principal, Emily Liddell.

Although the new policies seem to look promising and seem to be great in order to keep bullies in line, or to help those with issues, many fear that nothing will change. Students wonder if these policies will stick to what they have promised, especially when some have had experiences where the school didn’t get involved when they reported issues with others. However students and teachers have voiced their opinions on what would be more effective with or without the newly added protocols.

“We have less bullying here in our school, because it isn’t as widespread,” commented, AVID teacher, Brian Good. “Even so that doesn’t mean that the issues simply disappeared. Students still face issues, and I think it’d be more effective if students could confide in other students.”